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Biochemistry. 2010 Jan 12;49(1):166-78. doi: 10.1021/bi901086v.

Cell membrane expression of cardiac sodium channel Na(v)1.5 is modulated by alpha-actinin-2 interaction.

Author information

1
Centre de Recherche Université Laval Robert-Giffard, Quebec City, QC, Canada.

Abstract

Cardiac sodium channel Na(v)1.5 plays a critical role in heart excitability and conduction. The molecular mechanism that underlies the expression of Na(v)1.5 at the cell membrane is poorly understood. Previous studies demonstrated that cytoskeleton proteins can be involved in the regulation of cell surface expression and localization of several ion channels. We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen to identify Na(v)1.5-associated proteins that may be involved in channel function and expression. We identified alpha-actinin-2 as an interacting partner of the cytoplasmic loop connecting domains III and IV of Na(v)1.5 (Na(v)1.5/LIII-IV). Co-immunoprecipitation and His(6) pull-down assays confirmed the physical association between Na(v)1.5 and alpha-actinin-2 and showed that the spectrin-like repeat domain is essential for binding of alpha-actinin-2 to Na(v)1.5. Patch-clamp studies revealed that the interaction with alpha-actinin-2 increases sodium channel density without changing their gating properties. Consistent with these findings, coexpression of alpha-actinin-2 and Na(v)1.5 in tsA201 cells led to an increase in the level of expression of Na(v)1.5 at the cell membrane as determined by cell surface biotinylation. Lastly, immunostaining experiments showed that alpha-actinin-2 was colocalized with Na(v)1.5 along the Z-lines and in the plasma membrane. Our data suggest that alpha-actinin-2, which is known to regulate the functional expression of the potassium channels, may play a role in anchoring Na(v)1.5 to the membrane by connecting the channel to the actin cytoskeleton network.

PMID:
19943616
PMCID:
PMC2920038
DOI:
10.1021/bi901086v
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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