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Circ J. 2010 Jan;74(1):77-85. Epub 2009 Nov 27.

Early induction of hypothermia during cardiac arrest improves neurological outcomes in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who undergo emergency cardiopulmonary bypass and percutaneous coronary intervention.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiology, Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care, Surugadai Nihon University Hospital, Japan. kennagao@med.nihon-u.ac.jp

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Therapeutic hypothermia for comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has demonstrated neurological benefits. Although early cooling during cardiac arrest enhances efficacy in animal studies, few clinical studies are available.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

The 171 patients who failed to respond to conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation were studied prospectively. Patients underwent emergency cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) plus intra-aortic balloon pumping, with subsequent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) if needed. Mild hypothermia (34 degrees C for 3 days) was induced during cardiac arrest or after return of spontaneous circulation. Of the 171 patients, 21 (12.3%) had a favorable neurological outcome at hospital discharge. An unadjusted rate of favorable outcome decreased in a stepwise fashion for increasing quartiles of collapse-to-34 degrees C interval (P=0.016). An adjusted odds ratio for favorable outcome after collapse-to-CPB interval was 0.89 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.82-0.97) and after CPB-to-34 degrees C interval, 0.99 (95%CI 0.98-0.99) when collapse-to-34 degrees C interval was divided into 2 components. Favorable neurological accuracy of a collapse-to-CPB interval at a cutoff of 55.5 min and CPB-to-34 degrees C interval at a cutoff of 21.5 min was 85.4% and 89.5%, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

Early attainment of a core temperature had neurological benefits for patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who underwent CPB and PCI. (Circ J 2010; 74: 77 - 85).

PMID:
19942784
DOI:
10.1253/circj.cj-09-0502
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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