Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Osteoporos Int. 2010 Sep;21(9):1487-91. doi: 10.1007/s00198-009-1117-5. Epub 2009 Nov 21.

The association between osteoporosis and static balance in elderly women.

Author information

1
Physiotherapy Course, Department of Biomechanics, Medicine and Rehabilitation of Locomotor System, University of São Paulo, School of Medicine, Ribeirão Preto FMRP-USP, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil. dabreu@fmrp.usp.br

Abstract

SUMMARY:

This study aimed at answering the question: do people with high bone loss have greater postural instability? Groups were separated into group 1: women with normal bone mineral density, group 2: women with osteopenia, and group 3: women with osteoporosis. The balance was evaluated in four upright postural situations. Osteoporosis group had greater oscillation in the anteroposterior displacement in all situations compared to control group and the greatest mediolateral displacement in all situations compared to other groups.

INTRODUCTION:

It is not known whether the presence of osteoporosis can be considered a factor aggravating the postural control. This study aimed at answering the question: do people with high bone loss have greater postural instability?

METHODS:

This study was divided into three groups: group 1 (n = 20) consisting of women with normal bone mineral density, group 2 (n = 20) women with osteopenia, and group 3 (n = 20) women with osteoporosis. All the participants were submitted to evaluation of the balance using the Polhemus system in four upright postural situations.

RESULTS:

Osteoporosis group had greater oscillation in the anteroposterior displacement in all situations compared to control group. The osteoporosis group also showed the greatest mediolateral displacement in all situations compared to other groups.

CONCLUSION:

The results suggest that osteoporotic women had the worst balance, possibly due to the more pronounced body changes compared to non-osteoporotic women.

PMID:
19936868
DOI:
10.1007/s00198-009-1117-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center