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J Surg Res. 2011 Jun 1;168(1):42-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jss.2009.08.003. Epub 2009 Sep 5.

Diet composition affects surgery-associated weight loss in rats with a compromised alimentary tract.

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1
Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky 40202, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is the fastest growing cancer in terms of incidence and has a high mortality rate. The animal model to study EAC uses esophagoduodenal anastomosis (EDA) to induce mixed-reflux (bile/acid) causing esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus, and EAC sequence within 6 mo. However, the lack of fully functional stomach in these rats leads to the development of malnutrition.

METHODS:

We have assessed the ability of a chemically pure, purified ingredient diet (AIN-93M) to reduce surgery-associated malnutrition in rats that have undergone the EDA-surgery. Animals were either sham- (SH) or EDA-operated and fed either a grain-based rodent diet (RD) (SH-RD, n=3; EDA-RD, n=10) or a purified diet (PD) (SH-PD, n=4; EDA-PD, n=11). The animals were weighed periodically for assessment of weight gain and euthanized at the end of 24 wk to measure esophageal tumor incidence.

RESULTS:

Animals that underwent sham surgery continued to gain weight throughout the study period and no tumors were detected. The EDA-operated animals had significantly lower weight gain compared with sham animals. There was no significant difference in weight gain among EDA animals fed two different types of diets until 9 wk after the surgery. After 9 wk, EDA-RD continued to lose weight significantly, whereas the weight loss leveled in EDA-PD (P<0.001). At termination, neither tissue histopathology nor tumor incidence was significantly different between the groups.

CONCLUSION:

These results show that compared with a natural ingredient diet, a purified ingredient diet can reduce surgery-associated weight loss in rats with a compromised alimentary tract. This reduction in malnutrition has the potential to reduce the confounding effects of weight loss on future animal studies reported.

PMID:
19932903
PMCID:
PMC2888995
DOI:
10.1016/j.jss.2009.08.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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