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Am J Hypertens. 2010 Feb;23(2):142-8. doi: 10.1038/ajh.2009.215. Epub 2009 Nov 19.

Economic evaluation of home blood pressure monitoring with or without telephonic behavioral self-management in patients with hypertension.

Author information

1
Center for Clinical and Genetic Economics, Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, USA. shelby.reed@duke.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The Take Control of Your Blood Pressure trial evaluated the effect of a multicomponent telephonic behavioral lifestyle intervention, patient self-monitoring, and both interventions combined compared with usual care on reducing systolic blood pressure during 24 months. The combined intervention led to a significant reduction in systolic blood pressure compared with usual care alone. We examined direct and patient time costs associated with each intervention.

METHODS:

We conducted a prospective economic evaluation alongside a randomized controlled trial of 636 patients with hypertension participating in the study interventions. Medical costs were estimated using electronic data representing medical services delivered within the health system. Intervention-related costs were derived using information collected during the trial, administrative records, and published unit costs.

RESULTS:

During 24 months, patients incurred a mean of $6,965 (s.d., $22,054) in inpatient costs and $8,676 (s.d., $9,368) in outpatient costs, with no significant differences among the intervention groups. With base-case assumptions, intervention costs were estimated at $90 (s.d., $2) for home blood pressure monitoring, $345 (s.d., $64) for the behavioral intervention ($31 per telephone encounter), and $416 (s.d., $93) for the combined intervention. Patient time costs were estimated at $585 (s.d., $487) for home monitoring, $55 (s.d., $16) for the behavioral intervention, and $741 (s.d., $529) for the combined intervention.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our analysis demonstrated that the interventions are cost-additive to the health-care system in the short term and that patients' time costs are nontrivial.

PMID:
19927132
PMCID:
PMC2901769
DOI:
10.1038/ajh.2009.215
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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