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AIDS Behav. 2010 Oct;14(5):1198-202. doi: 10.1007/s10461-009-9632-0.

Acceptability of infant male circumcision as part of HIV prevention and male reproductive health efforts in Gaborone, Botswana, and surrounding areas.

Author information

1
Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA. rplank@partners.org

Abstract

Adult male circumcision reduces a man's risk for heterosexual HIV acquisition. Infant circumcision is safer, easier and less costly but not widespread in southern Africa. Questionnaires were administered to sixty mothers of newborn boys in Botswana: 92% responded they would circumcise if the procedure were available in a clinical setting, primarily to prevent future HIV infection, and 85% stated the infant's father must participate in the decision. Neonatal male circumcision appears to be acceptable in Botswana and deserves urgent attention in resource-limited regions with high HIV prevalence, with the aim to expand services in safe, culturally acceptable and sustainable ways.

PMID:
19924526
PMCID:
PMC2894259
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-009-9632-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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