Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Nutr Health Aging. 2009 Dec;13(10):899-905.

Dietary folate, vitamin B-12, vitamin B-6 and incident Alzheimer's disease: the cache county memory, health and aging study.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences and Center for Epidemiologic Research, Utah State University, Logan, UT, 84322-8700, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine associations between dietary and supplemental folate, vitamin B-12 and vitamin B-6 and incident Alzheimer's disease (AD) among elderly men and women.

DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS:

Data collected were from participants of the Cache County Memory, Health and Aging Study, a longitudinal study of 5092 men and women 65 years and older who were residents of Cache County, Utah in 1995.

MEASUREMENTS:

Multistage clinical assessment procedures were used to identify incident cases of AD. Dietary data were collected using a 142-item food frequency questionnaire. Cox Proportional Hazards (CPH) modeling was used to determine hazard ratios across quintiles of micronutrient intake.

RESULTS:

202 participants were diagnosed with incident AD during follow-up (1995-2004). In multivariable CPH models that controlled for the effects of gender, age, education, and other covariates there were no observed differences in risk of AD or dementia by increasing quintiles of total intake of folate, vitamin B-12, or vitamin B-6. Similarly, there were no observed differences in risk of AD by regular use of either folate or B6 supplements.

CONCLUSION:

Dietary intake of B-vitamins from food and supplemental sources appears unrelated to incidence of dementia and AD. Further studies examining associations between dietary intakes of B-vitamins, biomarkers of B-vitamin status and cognitive endpoints are warranted.

PMID:
19924351
PMCID:
PMC3646477
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center