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J Refract Surg. 2009 Nov;25(11):1039-41. doi: 10.3928/1081597X-20090617-13. Epub 2009 Nov 13.

Influence of original flap creation method on incidence of epithelial ingrowth after LASIK retreatment.

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  • 1Price Vision Group, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To compare the rate of epithelial ingrowth after LASIK retreatment among eyes with flaps created by femtosecond laser and those created by mechanical microkeratome.

METHODS:

Postoperative results from 272 consecutive LASIK retreatments performed by a single surgeon over a 4-year period were reviewed retrospectively to identify cases that developed clinically significant epithelial ingrowth, defined as that which required surgical removal. Flaps for the original LASIK treatments were created using a mechanical microkeratome or femtosecond laser. The same technique to lift the flap at the time of retreatment was used in all eyes included in this study.

RESULTS:

LASIK retreatment was performed in 132 eyes that had the initial flap created using a mechanical microkeratome (microkeratome group). Epithelial ingrowth was identified in 11 eyes of 9 patients. Surgical intervention to remove the epithelium from the stromal interface was required in 8 (6.1%) eyes. Femtosecond laser was used to create the initial LASIK flap in 140 eyes that required retreatment (femtosecond group). Epithelial ingrowth after LASIK retreatment was identified in 2 eyes of 1 patient in the femtosecond group (P=.004). Neither of these 2 eyes required surgical intervention to remove the epithelium from the stromal interface (P=.017).

CONCLUSIONS:

Eyes with femtosecond laser-created flaps may be less likely to develop significant epithelial ingrowth after LASIK retreatment when compared with eyes in which the flap was created using a mechanical microkeratome. The difference in rate of epithelial ingrowth may be related to the geometry of the flap edge.

PMID:
19921773
DOI:
10.3928/1081597X-20090617-13
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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