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Diabetes Care. 2010 Feb;33(2):278-80. doi: 10.2337/dc09-1539. Epub 2009 Nov 16.

Decaffeinated coffee and glucose metabolism in young men.

Author information

1
Department of Health and Nutrition Sciences, Brooklyn College of the City, University of New York, New York, New York, USA. jamesg@brooklyn.cuny.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The epidemiological association between coffee drinking and decreased risk of type 2 diabetes is strong. However, caffeinated coffee acutely impairs glucose metabolism. We assessed acute effects of decaffeinated coffee on glucose and insulin levels.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

This was a randomized, cross-over, placebo-controlled trial of the effects of decaffeinated coffee, caffeinated coffee, and caffeine on glucose, insulin, and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) levels during a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in 11 young men.

RESULTS:

Within the first hour of the OGTT, glucose and insulin were higher for decaffeinated coffee than for placebo (P < 0.05). During the whole OGTT, decaffeinated coffee yielded higher insulin than placebo and lower glucose and a higher insulin sensitivity index than caffeine. Changes in GIP could not explain any beverage effects on glucose and insulin.

CONCLUSIONS:

Some types of decaffeinated coffee may acutely impair glucose metabolism but less than caffeine.

PMID:
19918017
PMCID:
PMC2809264
DOI:
10.2337/dc09-1539
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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