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Rev Prat. 2009 Oct 20;59(8 Suppl):25-31.

[Interactions between teenagers and general practitioners during consultations: progression of felt disquiet and impact of physicians' training. SOCRATE 1 study].

[Article in French]

Author information

1
Groupe ADOC, 1, allée des Tilleuls, 17430 Lussant, France. groupadoc@orange.fr

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study aimed at assessing the frequency of adolescents'ill-being beyond their complaint during a general practitioner's (GP) consultation, analyzing the progression of their feeling during an ordinary consultation, comparing it to the physician's feeling and checking whether this feeling could correlate a short and specific training received by the physician.

METHOD:

53 physicians were divided into 2 groups: 29 physicians experienced with adolescents and 24 control physicians from a non-adjacent department. 665 consultations involving adolescents aged 12-20 years were analyzed using 2 questionnaires filled in by adolescents before and after the consultation as well as a questionnaire filled in by physicians at the end of the consultation.

RESULTS:

Among adolescents consulting for "non-psychological" complaints, one out of six acknowledged having other problems. Sixty percent of them considered talking about these problems during the consultation. During a single GP's consultation, the adolescents'sensation of feeling good about themselves, being understood and listened to significantly improved. However, such an improvement did not depend on the physician's experience in adolescents. Nevertheless, experienced physicians are more circumspect than control physicians regarding the level of well-being felt or put forward by adolescents.

CONCLUSION:

The study reveals that a short awareness program is sufficient to sustainably draw general practitioners' attention on teenagers' disquiet, but insufficient to induce an improvement of teenagers' feeling, which is anyhow recorded during a consultation. Measuring an impact on teenagers requires a probably more thorough training for physicians and a longer-term analysis by teenagers.

PMID:
19916282
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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