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Neuroimage. 2010 Feb 15;49(4):3099-109. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2009.11.015. Epub 2009 Nov 12.

Ten simple rules for dynamic causal modeling.

Author information

1
Laboratory for Social and Neural Systems Research, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. k.stephan@iew.uzh.ch

Abstract

Dynamic causal modeling (DCM) is a generic Bayesian framework for inferring hidden neuronal states from measurements of brain activity. It provides posterior estimates of neurobiologically interpretable quantities such as the effective strength of synaptic connections among neuronal populations and their context-dependent modulation. DCM is increasingly used in the analysis of a wide range of neuroimaging and electrophysiological data. Given the relative complexity of DCM, compared to conventional analysis techniques, a good knowledge of its theoretical foundations is needed to avoid pitfalls in its application and interpretation of results. By providing good practice recommendations for DCM, in the form of ten simple rules, we hope that this article serves as a helpful tutorial for the growing community of DCM users.

PMID:
19914382
PMCID:
PMC2825373
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuroimage.2009.11.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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