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J Infect Dis. 2009 Dec 15;200(12):1893-900. doi: 10.1086/648407.

Dengue virus infections and maternal antibody decay in a prospective birth cohort study of Vietnamese infants.

Author information

1
Oxford University Clinical Research Unit, Hong Vuong Hospital, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

Abstract

Dengue hemorrhagic fever can occur in primary dengue virus (DENV) infection of infants. The decay of maternally derived DENV immunoglobulin (Ig) G and the incidence of DENV infection were determined in a prospectively studied cohort of 1244 Vietnamese infants. Higher concentrations of total IgG and DENV-reactive IgG were found in cord plasma relative to maternal plasma. Maternally derived DENV-neutralizing and E protein-reactive IgG titers declined to below measurable levels in >90% of infants by 6 months of age. In contrast, IgG reactive with whole DENV virions persisted until 12 months of age in 20% of infants. Serological surveillance identified 10 infants with asymptomatic DENV infection for an incidence of 1.7 cases per 100 person-years. DENV-neutralizing antibodies remained measurable for > or = 1 year after infection. These results suggest that whereas DENV infection in infants is frequently subclinical, there is a window between 4 and 12 months of age where virion-binding but nonneutralizing IgG could facilitate antibody-dependent enhancement.

PMID:
19911991
PMCID:
PMC4340501
DOI:
10.1086/648407
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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