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Can Fam Physician. 2009 Nov;55(11):1104-1105.e4.

Childhood immunization: Availability of primary care providers in Ontario.

Author information

1
University of Toronto, Social Sciences, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, ON M1C 1A4.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine childhood immunization levels relative to the number of family physicians, pediatricians, and public health nurses in Ontario.

DESIGN:

Retrospective comparative analysis of publicly available data on immunization coverage levels and the relative number of family physicians, pediatricians, and public health nurses.

SETTING:

Ontario.

PARTICIPANTS:

Seven-year-old children, family physicians, pediatricians, and public health nurses in Ontario.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

The association between immunization coverage levels and the relative number of family physicians, pediatricians, and public health nurses.

RESULTS:

We found correlations between immunization coverage levels and the relative number (ie, per 1000 Ontario residents) of family physicians (rho = 0.60) and pediatricians (rho = 0.70) and a lower correlation with the relative number of public health nurses (rho = 0.40), although none of these correlations was significant. A comparison of temporal trends illustrated that variation in the relative number of family physicians and pediatricians in Ontario was associated with similar variation in immunization coverage levels.

CONCLUSION:

Increasing the number of family physicians and pediatricians might help to boost access to immunizations and perhaps other components of cost-saving childhood preventive care.

PMID:
19910599
PMCID:
PMC2776804
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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