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Am J Public Health. 2010 Aug;100(8):1506-13. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2008.157776. Epub 2009 Nov 12.

Correlates and consequences of venous thromboembolism: The Iowa Women's Health Study.

Author information

1
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA. lutsey@umn.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We sought to document incidence, case-fatality, and recurrence rates of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in women and to explore the relationship of demographic, lifestyle, and anthropometric factors to VTE incidence.

METHODS:

Data from participants aged 55 to 69 years in the Iowa Women's Health Study were linked to Medicare data for 1986 through 2004 (n = 40 377) to identify hospitalized VTE patients.

RESULTS:

A total of 2137 women developed VTE, yielding an incidence rate of 4.04 per 1000 person-years. The 28-day case-fatality rate was 7.7%, and the 1-year recurrence rate was 3.4%. Educational attainment, physical activity, and age at menopause were inversely associated with VTE. Risk of secondary (particularly cancer-related) VTE was higher among smokers than among those who had never smoked. Body mass index, waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, height, and diabetes were positively associated with VTE risk. Hormone replacement therapy use was associated with increased risk of idiopathic VTE.

CONCLUSIONS:

VTE is a significant source of morbidity and mortality in older women. Risk was elevated among women who were smokers, physically inactive, overweight, and diabetic, indicating that lifestyle contributes to VTE risk.

PMID:
19910349
PMCID:
PMC2901301
DOI:
10.2105/AJPH.2008.157776
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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