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Am J Public Health. 2010 Aug;100(8):1493-9. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2008.158949. Epub 2009 Nov 12.

Association of race, substance abuse, and health insurance coverage with use of highly active antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected women, 2005.

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1
Department of Health Policy, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20006, USA. lblanton@gwu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We examined racial/ethnic disparities in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) use and whether differences are moderated by substance use or insurance status, using data from the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS).

METHODS:

Logistic regression examined HAART use in a longitudinal cohort of women for whom HAART was clinically indicated in 2005 (N = 1354).

RESULTS:

Approximately 3 of every 10 eligible women reported not taking HAART. African American and Hispanic women were less likely than were White women to use HAART. After we adjusted for potential confounders, the higher likelihood of not using HAART persisted for African American but not for Hispanic women. Uninsured and privately insured women, regardless of race/ethnicity, were less likely than were Medicaid enrollees to use HAART. Although alcohol use was related to HAART nonuse, illicit drug use was not.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings suggest that expanding and improving insurance coverage should increase access to antiretroviral therapy across racial/ethnic groups, but it is not likely to eliminate the disparity in use of HAART between African American and White women with HIV/AIDS.

PMID:
19910347
PMCID:
PMC2901300
DOI:
10.2105/AJPH.2008.158949
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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