Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Acad Radiol. 2010 Feb;17(2):181-7. doi: 10.1016/j.acra.2009.08.011. Epub 2009 Nov 11.

The efficiency of PC-MRI in diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus and prediction of shunt response.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa, Turkey. droktayalgin@gmail.com

Abstract

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES:

In this prospective study, we aimed to reveal the efficiency of phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) in the diagnosis of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (INPH) and prediction of shunt response.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

The study group consisted of 43 patients with INPH diagnosis and 15 asymptomatic age-matched controls. PC-MRI studies were applied on cerebral aqueduct and superior sagittal sinus (SSS) in all the cases.

RESULTS:

The maximum and mean cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow velocities were significantly higher in the INPH patients compared with the controls (P < .05). CSF stroke volume (43.2 + or - 63.8 microL) and output/min (3921 + or - 5668 microL) were remarkably higher in the NPH group compared with the control group (3.9 + or - 3.9 microL, 439 + or - 487 microL, respectively) (P < .05). Maximum and mean venous velocity values of the INPH patients (maximum, 19.2 + or - 4.3 cm/s; mean, 16 + or - 3.7 cm/s), were lower than those of the control group (maximum, 21.8 + or - 4.6 cm/s; mean, 18.9 + or - 3.9 cm/s) (P < .05). Stroke volume and venous output/min values of INPH patients in SSS, were significantly lower than those of the control group (P < .001, P = .007, respectively). The response of INPH patients against shunt treatment showed no statistical correlation with any of the PC-MRI parameters (P > .05).

CONCLUSION:

The measurement of CSF venous flow velocities with PC-MRI is a noninvasive test that benefits INPH diagnosis, but remains inadequate in prediction of response against shunt treatment.

PMID:
19910214
DOI:
10.1016/j.acra.2009.08.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center