Format

Send to

Choose Destination
BMC Public Health. 2009 Nov 12;9:410. doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-9-410.

Unemployment and ill health: a connection through inflammation?

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Kuopio University Hospital and Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Kuopio, FI-70210 Kuopio, Finland. jukka.hintikka@kuh.fi

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Unemployment is a source of acute and long-term psychosocial stress. Acute and chronic psychosocial stress can induce pronounced changes in human immune responses. In this study we tested our hypothesis that stress-induced low-grade tissue inflammation is more prevalent among the unemployed.

METHODS:

We determined the inflammatory status of 225 general population subjects below the general retirement age (65 years in Finland). Those who had levels of both interleukin-6 (>or= 0.97 pg/mL) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (>or= 1.49 mg/L) above the median were assessed to have an elevated inflammatory status (n = 72).

RESULTS:

An elevated inflammatory status was more common among the unemployed than among other study participants (59% versus 30%, p = 0.011). In the final multivariate model, those who were unemployed had over five-fold greater odds for having an elevated inflammatory status (OR 5.20, 95% CI 1.55-17.43, p = 0.008).

CONCLUSION:

This preliminary finding suggests that stress-induced low-grade inflammation might be a link between unemployment and ill health.

PMID:
19909544
PMCID:
PMC2780415
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2458-9-410
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center