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Phys Ther Sport. 2009 Nov;10(4):125-30. doi: 10.1016/j.ptsp.2009.07.005. Epub 2009 Oct 12.

The influence of Mulligan ankle taping during balance performance in subjects with unilateral chronic ankle instability.

Author information

1
Curtin University of Technology, School of Physiotherapy, Bentley, Australia. d.hopper@curtin.edu.au

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether Mulligan ankle tape influenced the performance in subjects with unilateral chronic ankle instability (CAI) during static balance; postural sway recovery patterns after hopping and dynamic tracking balance tasks.

DESIGN:

A cross-sectional, within-subjects experimental study design between 4 ankle conditions (taped; untaped: injured and uninjured).

PARTICIPANTS:

20 volunteer recreational athletes with unilateral CAI were recruited. Means and standard deviations highlighted the athletes' characteristics: age =23+/-1 years; height=173.1+/-2.4 cm; weight=69.3+/-3 kg; Functional Ankle Disability Index (FADI)=93.5+/-5.1% and FADI Sport=84.2+/-9.4%.

INTERVENTIONS:

Mulligan ankle taping.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS:

Static balance (10s); postural sway recovery patterns after a 30s functional hop test (immediately, 30 and 60s); dynamic tracking balance tasks (wandering, target overshoot and reaction-time).

RESULTS:

Between the four conditions, static balance showed no significant differences (p=0.792); significant changes occurred in postural sway over time (p<0.001); no significant changes were reported for the dynamic tracking tasks. Wandering was highly correlated with reaction-time and overshooting (p<0.01).

CONCLUSION:

Under resting and fatigued conditions, Mulligan ankle taping did not impact on the neuromuscular control during static and dynamic balance in subjects with healthy and unstable ankles.

PMID:
19897165
DOI:
10.1016/j.ptsp.2009.07.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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