Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
CMAJ. 1991 Feb 1;144(3):318-24.

Estimated burden of diabetes mellitus in Manitoba according to health insurance claims: a pilot study.

Author information

1
Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To estimate the burden of diabetes mellitus in Manitoba from 1980 to 1984.

DESIGN:

Review of the Manitoba Health Services Commission (MHSC) database. The validity of the MHSC data was established through two substudies: one involved self-reports from a survey of elderly Manitobans, and the other involved people with confirmed diabetes enrolled in the provincial diabetes education program.

SUBJECTS:

Sample of 100,000 people stratified by age, sex and MHSC health region: 50,000 were aged 25 to 64 years, and 50,000 were aged 65 or more. All MHSC claims containing the ICD-9-CM code for diabetes mellitus or gestational diabetes were identified.

MAIN RESULTS:

Of the sample 7627 people were found to have a diagnosis of diabetes, the annual prevalence being 0.8% among those 25 to 44 years of age, 3.5% among those 45 to 64 and 7.6% among those 65 or older. The annual incidence rate among those over 25 years of age was 7.8 per 1000. Of the 4556 pregnant women 25 to 44 years old 85 (1.9%) had diabetes; 23 were believed to have gestational diabetes.

CONCLUSIONS:

The incidence and prevalence rates were similar to those determined on the basis of self-reports in Canadian and US national surveys. The use of an administrative database such as that of the MHSC will provide key information for planning health services for diabetic patients and will permit the monitoring of long-term trends in the incidence and prevalence of the disease.

PMID:
1989711
PMCID:
PMC1452682
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center