Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am J Prev Med. 2009 Dec;37(6 Suppl 1):S209-16. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2009.08.018.

A low-literacy medication education tool for safety-net hospital patients.

Author information

1
VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, 11301 Wilshire Boulevard (111G), Los Angeles, CA 90073, USA. kcordasco@mednet.ucla.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

To improve medication adherence in cardiac patients, in partnership with a safety-net provider, this research team developed and evaluated a low-literacy medication education tool.

METHODS:

Using principles of community-based participatory research, the team developed a prototype of a low-literacy hospital discharge medication education tool, customizable for each patient, featuring instruction-specific icons and pictures of pills. In 2007, a randomized controlled clinical trial was performed, testing the tool's effect on posthospitalization self-reported medication adherence and knowledge, 2 weeks postdischarge in English- and Spanish-speaking safety-net inpatients. To validate the self-report measure, 4 weeks postdischarge, investigators collected self-reports of the number of pills remaining for each medication in a subsample of participants. Nurses rated tool acceptability.

RESULTS:

Among the 166/210 eligible participants (79%) completing the Week-2 interview, self-reported medication adherence was 70% (95% CI=62%, 79%) in intervention participants and 78% (95% CI=72%, 84%) in controls (p=0.13). Among the 85 participants (31%) completing the Week-4 interview, self-reported pill counts indicated high adherence (greater than 90%) and did not differ between study arms. Self-reported adherence was correlated with self-reported pill count in intervention participants (R=0.5, p=0.004) but not in controls (R=0.07, p=0.65). There were no differences by study arm in medication knowledge. The nurses rated the tool as highly acceptable.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although the evaluation did not demonstrate the tool to have any effect on self-reported medication adherence, patients who received the schedule self-reported their medication adherence more accurately, perhaps indicating improved understanding of their medication regimen and awareness of non-adherence.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00408733.

PMID:
19896021
DOI:
10.1016/j.amepre.2009.08.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for eScholarship, California Digital Library, University of California
    Loading ...
    Support Center