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J Nutr. 2010 Jan;140(1):38-43. doi: 10.3945/jn.109.111427. Epub 2009 Nov 4.

Acute ingestion of long-chain (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids decreases fibrinolysis in men with metabolic syndrome.

Author information

1
Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg C 1870, Denmark; 4Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada, N1G 2W1.

Abstract

Individuals with metabolic syndrome (MetS) often have elevated plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA), contributing to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. PAI-1 and t-PA may be affected by chronic (n-3) long-chain PUFA [(n-3)LCPUFA] supplementation; however, the acute impact of fat ingestion on these risk factors has not been established. Our objective was to investigate the acute effect of (n-3)LCPUFA on plasma PAI-1, t-PA, and platelet aggregation. We conducted a randomized crossover study in which men (n = 8, > or =45 y) with MetS consumed water or a high-saturated fat beverage (1 g fat/kg body weight) with either a high or low content of (n-3)LCPUFA. Blood samples were collected over 8 h to measure triacylglycerol (TAG), PAI-1, t-PA, and platelet aggregation. Both fat loads resulted in a significant increase in whole blood TAG concentration, plasma PAI-1 and t-PA concentrations, and PAI-1 activity, as well as a significant decrease in t-PA activity during the postprandial period. Interestingly, PAI-1 concentration and activity increased more following the high (n-3)LCPUFA compared with the low (n-3)LCPUFA beverage (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the high (n-3)LCPUFA beverage resulted in a lower t-PA activity (P < 0.05), whereas the effects of the 2 fat loads on the plasma t-PA concentration and platelet aggregation did not differ. Overall, acute intake of a high (n-3)LCPUFA beverage shifted the balance between plasma PAI-1 and t-PA, which might indicate a lower capacity for fibrinolysis.

PMID:
19889809
DOI:
10.3945/jn.109.111427
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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