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Ann R Coll Surg Engl. 2010 Mar;92(2):147-53. doi: 10.1308/003588410X12518836438840. Epub 2009 Nov 2.

Conservatively treated massive prolapsed discs: a 7-year follow-up.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedics, Royal Berkshire Hospital, Reading, UK. richard.benson@ndos.ox.ac.uk

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The natural history of a lumbar hernia of the nucleus pulposus (HNP) is not fully known and clear indications for operative intervention cannot be established from the literature. Several studies have shown that the largest discs appear to have the greatest tendency to resolve. The aim of this study was to investigate whether massive prolapsed discs can be safely managed conservatively once clinical improvement has occurred.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Thirty-seven patients were studied by clinical assessments and serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over 2 years. Patients had severe sciatica at first, but began to show clinical improvement despite the large disc herniations. Clinical assessment included the Lasegue test and neurological appraisal. The Oswestry Disability Index was used to measure function and changes in function. Serial MRI studies allowed measurement of volume changes of the herniated disc material over a period of time.

RESULTS:

Initial follow-up at an average of 23.2 months revealed that 83% had a complete and sustained recovery at the initial follow-up. Only four patients required a discectomy. The average Oswestry disability index improved from 58% to 15%. Volumetric analysis of serial MRI scans found an average reduction of 64% in disc size. There was a poor correlation between clinical improvement and the extent of disc resolution.

CONCLUSIONS:

A massive disc herniation can pursue a favourable clinical course. If early progress is shown, the long-term prognosis is very good and even massive disc herniations can be treated conservatively.

PMID:
19887021
PMCID:
PMC3025225
DOI:
10.1308/003588410X12518836438840
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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