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Scand J Gastroenterol. 2009;44(12):1435-42. doi: 10.3109/00365520903367254.

A systematic review and meta-analysis of anti-adhesion molecule therapy in patients with active Crohn's disease.

Author information

1
Department of General Surgery, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing, PR China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Due to the crucial role played by adhesion molecules in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD), targeting of these molecules has recently been proposed as a new direction for the development of anti-inflammatory strategies for CD. The aim of this study was to provide up-to-date evidence on the effectiveness and safety of anti-adhesion molecule therapy in treating active CD.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

We studied articles retrieved by PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library and the Science Citation Index for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) relevant to CD and anti-adhesion molecule therapy.

RESULTS:

Seven RCTs comparing anti-adhesion molecule therapy with placebo were included in a meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy and safety of anti-adhesion molecule strategies in active CD. On the basis of pooled results of the seven RCTs (n = 2228), we found a significant difference in clinical remission rates between groups [relative risk (RR) 1.31, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.12-1.52, fixed-effect model]. Five RCTs (n = 2178) compared the response rates of anti-adhesion molecule therapy and placebo; in overall analysis, anti-adhesion molecule therapy was effective for active CD (RR 1.28, 95% CI 1.16-1.42, random-effect model). In five studies enrolling 1867 individuals, anti-adhesion molecule therapy did not increase adverse events (RR 1.03, 95% CI 0.98-1.08, fixed-effect model).

CONCLUSIONS:

Anti-adhesion molecule therapy, which could prevent leukocyte recruitment, was effective and safe for treating active CD. Because of the small number of studies included in this meta-analysis, the results should be interpreted with caution.

PMID:
19883269
DOI:
10.3109/00365520903367254
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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