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Yonsei Med J. 2009 Oct 31;50(5):667-71. doi: 10.3349/ymj.2009.50.5.667. Epub 2009 Oct 21.

Growth and development of infants with asymptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

Author information

1
Department of Neonatology, Women and Children's Hospital, Qingdao, China. shanrb@tom.com

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To observe changes in audiology, intellectual development, behavior development, and physical growth during systematic follow-up of infants with asymptomatic congenital human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Fifty-two infants diagnosed with asymptomatic congenital HCMV infection from July 2003 to July 2007 served as the infection group, and 21 healthy infants served as the control group. All infants were confirmed to have HCMV infection by Fluorescent Quantative polymerase chain reaction (FQ-PCR). In both the infection and control groups, the neonates and infants at 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year of age underwent examinations.

RESULTS:

1) 20 items of National Black Nurses Association (NBNA) scores of neonates 12-14 days after birth in 2 groups were 38.3 +/- 1.95 and 38.5 +/- 2.29, without significant differences. 2) Auditory test: 50 ears of 25 cases in the infection group showed abnormal auditory thresholds in V waves with an abnormal rate of 14%, while no abnormalities were found in 21 cases in the control group. 3) Mental and psychomotor development index scores in the control group (107.49 +/- 11.31 and 107.19 +/- 10.98) were compared with those in 41 asymptomatically infected infants at 1 year of age (107.21 +/- 9.96 and 108.31 +/- 11.25), and no statistically significant difference was noted.

CONCLUSION:

1) An elevated threshold in the V wave was present in asymptomatically infected infants, but could not be detected through otoacoustic emission (OAE) screening. 2) Either in the neonatal or infant periods, asymptomatic congenital HCMV infection did not have a significant influence on nervous behavior or on physical and intellectual development.

KEYWORDS:

Cytomegalovirus; congenital infections; infant; sensorineural hearing loss

PMID:
19881970
PMCID:
PMC2768241
DOI:
10.3349/ymj.2009.50.5.667
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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