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Biochim Biophys Acta. 2010 Aug;1804(8):1666-75. doi: 10.1016/j.bbapap.2009.10.022. Epub 2009 Oct 30.

SIRT1-dependent regulation of chromatin and transcription: linking NAD(+) metabolism and signaling to the control of cellular functions.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA.

Abstract

Sirtuins comprise a family of NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylases and ADP-ribosyltransferases. Mammalian SIRT1 - a homolog of yeast Sir2, the prototypical member of the sirtuin family - is an important regulator of metabolism, cell differentiation and senescence, stress response, and cancer. As an NAD(+)-dependent enzyme, SIRT1 regulates gene expression programs in response to cellular metabolic status, thereby coordinating metabolic adaptation of the whole organism. Several important mechanisms have emerged for SIRT1-dependent regulation of transcription. First, SIRT1 can modulate chromatin function through direct deacetylation of histones as well as by promoting alterations in the methylation of histones and DNA, leading to the repression of transcription. The latter is accomplished through the recruitment of other nuclear enzymes to chromatin for histone methylation and DNA CpG methylation, suggesting a broader role of SIRT1 in epigenetic regulation. Second, SIRT1 can interact and deacetylate a broad range of transcription factors and coregulators, thereby regulating target gene expression both positively and negatively. Cellular energy state, specifically NAD(+) metabolism, plays a major role in the regulation of SIRT1 activity. Recent studies on the NAD(+) biosynthetic enzymes in the salvage pathway, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 (NMNAT-1), have revealed important functions for these enzymes in SIRT1-dependent transcription regulation. The collective molecular actions of SIRT1 control specific patterns of gene expression that modulate a wide variety of physiological outcomes.

PMID:
19879981
PMCID:
PMC2886162
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbapap.2009.10.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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