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J Assoc Nurses AIDS Care. 2010 Mar-Apr;21(2):144-52. doi: 10.1016/j.jana.2009.07.008. Epub 2009 Oct 30.

Relationships between stigma, social support, and depression in HIV-infected African American women living in the rural Southeastern United States.

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1
South Carolina Rural Health Research Center, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA.

Abstract

This cross-sectional study examined relationships between HIV-related stigma, social support, and depression in a sample of 340 HIV-infected African American women living in rural areas of the Southeastern United States. Three aspects of social support (availability of different types of support, sources of support, and satisfaction with support) and two aspects of HIV-related stigma (perceived stigma and internalized stigma) were measured. Perceived availability of support (p < .0001), sources of support (p = .03), satisfaction with support (p = .003), perceived stigma (p < .0001), and internalized stigma (p < .0001) were all significantly correlated with depression. Social support variables were negatively correlated and stigma variables were positively correlated with depression. HIV-related perceived stigma and internalized stigma were found to mediate the effect of sources of available support on depression. Study findings have implications for designing and implementing interventions to increase social support and decrease HIV-related stigma in order to decrease depression among African American women with HIV disease.

PMID:
19879778
PMCID:
PMC2826539
DOI:
10.1016/j.jana.2009.07.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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