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Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2009;88(12):1358-64. doi: 10.3109/00016340903317974.

Social support after stillbirth for prevention of maternal depression.

Author information

1
Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. psurkan@jhsph.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To study how social support is associated with ensuing maternal depression following stillbirth.

DESIGN:

Data from a population-based national postal questionnaire. Setting. Sweden.

POPULATION:

A total of 314 (83%) of all 380 Swedish-speaking women who gave birth to singleton stillborn infants in Sweden during 1991, identified through the Swedish Medical Birth Register.

METHODS:

Postal questionnaires addressing maternal social support and demographics were completed three years following the stillbirth. The association between support-related factors and later maternal depression was assessed using multivariable regression models.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale.

RESULTS:

In adjusted analyses, a father's refusal to talk about a stillborn baby with the mother was associated with an almost five-fold risk of later maternal depressive symptoms [adjusted risk ratio (RR) 4.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.5-14.5]. The mother's belief that she could talk with the infant's father about the child was associated with a reduced risk (adjusted RR 0.5, 95% CI 0.1-0.9).

CONCLUSIONS:

Unwillingness of the father to discuss a stillborn infant with the mother was related to subsequent maternal depressive symptomatology.

PMID:
19878084
DOI:
10.3109/00016340903317974
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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