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Am J Cardiol. 1991 Jan 1;67(1):7-12.

Outcomes of direct coronary angioplasty for acute myocardial infarction in candidates and non-candidates for thrombolytic therapy.

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1
Department of Medicine, Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital, Greensboro, North Carolina.

Abstract

Coronary angioplasty without prior thrombolytic therapy was performed in 383 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Patients were divided into 2 groups depending on whether they were candidates or non-candidates for thrombolytic therapy. Patients were not considered thrombolytic candidates if they: (1) presented in cardiogenic shock, (2) were greater than or equal to 75 years of age, (3) had had coronary artery bypass surgery or, (4) had a reperfusion time of greater than 6 hours. Thrombolytic and nonthrombolytic candidates had similar rates of reperfusion (92 vs 88%), nonfatal reinfarction (6.0 vs 5.9%) and recurrent myocardial ischemia (1.8 vs 0%). Thrombolytic candidates had a lower mortality rate (3.9 vs 24%, p less than 0.0001) and a lower incidence of bleeding (4.6 vs 10.9%, p less than 0.05). Improvement in left ventricular ejection fraction at follow-up angiography was 4.4% in thrombolytic and 10.5% in nonthrombolytic candidates (p less than 0.002). Ejection fraction improved most in patients with anterior wall AMI (7.7% in thrombolytic candidates, 15.1% in nonthrombolytic candidates) and in patients with reperfusion times greater than 6 hours (14.2%). These outcomes suggest that direct coronary angioplasty is a viable alternative method of reperfusion in patients with AMI who are candidates for thrombolytic therapy. Nonthrombolytic candidates are a high-risk group of patients. Direct coronary angioplasty may be beneficial in certain subgroups, especially for patients in cardiogenic shock and for patients presenting greater than 6 hours after the onset of chest pain with evidence of ongoing ischemia.

PMID:
1986507
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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