Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Curr Opin Hematol. 2010 Jan;17(1):9-17. doi: 10.1097/MOH.0b013e3283333930.

Recent developments and complexities in neutrophil transmigration.

Author information

1
Queen Mary University of London, William Harvey Research Institute, UK.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

As the migration of neutrophils from blood to inflamed tissues is an essential component of innate immunity and a key contributing factor to the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders, this aspect of leukocyte biology continues to be a highly dynamic field of research. This review summarizes recent findings in this area, focusing on the mechanisms that mediate neutrophil transmigration, an area where significant progress has been made.

RECENT FINDINGS:

The topics to be covered will include responses that are prerequisite to neutrophil migration through venular walls, such as leukocyte luminal crawling and cellular and molecular changes in leukocytes and endothelial cells (e.g. formation of protrusions) that collectively support leukocyte transendothelial cell migration. Advances in both paracellular and transcellular neutrophil migration through endothelial cells will be discussed, addressing the associated roles and regulation of expression of endothelial cell luminal and junctional adhesion molecules. Beyond the endothelium, migration through the vascular pericyte coverage and basement membrane will be reviewed.

SUMMARY:

The unquestionable role of neutrophils in the development and progression of inflammatory conditions suggests that a better understanding of the tissue-specific and stimulus-specific mechanisms that mediate this response may identify novel pathways that could be exploited for the development of more specific anti-inflammatory interventions.

PMID:
19864945
PMCID:
PMC2882030
DOI:
10.1097/MOH.0b013e3283333930
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center