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Am J Clin Oncol. 2010 Jun;33(3):300-3. doi: 10.1097/COC.0b013e3181aaca87.

Wide excision or Mohs micrographic surgery for the treatment of primary dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, McGill University Health Centre, 687 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ari.meguerditchian@muhc.mcgill.ca

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP) is a spindle cell tumor with a high local recurrence rate. Wide excision (WE) has been the standard treatment, but ideal margin width is poorly defined and Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) has emerged as an alternative procedure. This study examines the use of WE versus MMS for the treatment of primary DFSP at a single institution.

METHODS:

Retrospective review of 48 primary DFSP cases treated from 1971 to 2006. Patient demographics, tumor features, surgical modality (WE vs. MMS), final pathology, and clinical outcome were evaluated.

RESULTS:

Twenty-eight patients underwent WE versus 20 patients for MMS. Median age was 40 years. Median WE margin width was 2 cm. For MMS, the median number of layers required to clear the tumor was 2. Median maximal defect size was 10 cm for WE versus 9.4 cm for MMS. Advanced closure techniques were required for 18% WE versus 65% MMS (P = 0.001). Median operative time was significantly lower for WE at 77 minutes versus 257 minutes for MMS (P < 0.001). Positive margins were present in 21.4% (6/28) WE versus 0% MMS (P = 0.01). At a median follow-up of 49.9 months for WE and 40.4 months for MMS, local recurrence rates were 3.6% (1/28) and 0%, respectively (P = 1.0).

CONCLUSIONS:

From a surgical standpoint, WE was faster than MMS and resulted in a less complex defect/closure. Although positive margin resection was more common with WE, local control was ultimately similar for the 2 surgical modalities. The choice of WE versus MMS should be based on individualized patients/tumor characteristics and institutional expertise in these modalities.

PMID:
19858696
DOI:
10.1097/COC.0b013e3181aaca87
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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