Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Z Geburtshilfe Neonatol. 2009 Oct;213(5):194-200. doi: 10.1055/s-0029-1214405. Epub 2009 Oct 23.

The influence of smoking during pregnancy on fetal growth. Considering daily cigarette consumption and the SGA rate according to length of gestation.

Author information

1
Institute for Perinatal Auxology, Department of Paediatrics, University of Magdeburg, Germany. manfred.voigt@kliniksued-rostock.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Smoking is the most important risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcomes in industrialized nations and is associated with, amongst other adverse effects, a higher rate of small-for-gestational-age (SGA) neonates. The rate of SGA neonates born before 32 weeks and its association with smoking have so far not been the focus of attention.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

Using data of 643,288 primiparous women from the German perinatal statistics of 1995-2000, we aimed to investigate this relationship. We also analyzed our data according to daily cigarette consumption.

RESULTS:

We found that smoking during pregnancy was strongly associated with lower birth weight and higher SGA rates. This effect was especially pronounced in women >or=31 years. There was clear dose dependence with regard to daily cigarette consumption. An increase in SGA rates in smokers versus non-smokers can already be seen for very early preterm deliveries (31 weeks of gestation or less).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results allow the definition of groups of women who are at higher risk of SGA births. We show that especially older primiparous women (aged >or=31 years) who smoke >10 cigarettes a day are at increased risk of experiencing fetal growth restriction.

PMID:
19856242
DOI:
10.1055/s-0029-1214405
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart, New York
Loading ...
Support Center