Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Public Health. 2009 Oct;123(10):665-9. doi: 10.1016/j.puhe.2009.08.005. Epub 2009 Oct 24.

Association between levels of physical activity and poor self-rated health in Korean adults: The Third Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), 2005.

Author information

1
National Cancer Control Research Institute, National Cancer Centre, Goyang, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the association between level of physical activity and poor self-rated health in Korean adults.

STUDY DESIGN:

A cross-sectional study was conducted on 7,800 adults aged > or =19 years who completed the Health Interview and the Health Behavior Surveys, issued during the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2005).

METHODS:

The association between self-rated health and physical activity was tested using Chi-squared test. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to calculate the odds ratios of poor self-rated health for different levels of physical activity after adjusting for physical and chronic medical conditions.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of poor self-rated health was significantly lower as the level of physical activity increased, and odds ratios for poor self-rated health were significantly lower for higher levels of physical activity after adjusting for age, marital status, educational status, smoking, alcohol consumption, and the number of physical impairments and chronic medical conditions. The association was similar in different age groups and among healthy respondents and respondents with physical impairments or chronic medical conditions.

CONCLUSIONS:

Physical activity was positively associated with self-rated health in Koreans. The independent association between a lower level of physical activity and poor self-rated health supports public health programmes that encourage regular physical activity.

PMID:
19854457
DOI:
10.1016/j.puhe.2009.08.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center