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Cognition. 2010 Feb;114(2):227-52. doi: 10.1016/j.cognition.2009.09.007. Epub 2009 Oct 24.

The dark side of incremental learning: a model of cumulative semantic interference during lexical access in speech production.

Author information

1
Beckman Institute, University of Illinois, 405 North Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. goppenh2@illinois.edu

Abstract

Naming a picture of a dog primes the subsequent naming of a picture of a dog (repetition priming) and interferes with the subsequent naming of a picture of a cat (semantic interference). Behavioral studies suggest that these effects derive from persistent changes in the way that words are activated and selected for production, and some have claimed that the findings are only understandable by positing a competitive mechanism for lexical selection. We present a simple model of lexical retrieval in speech production that applies error-driven learning to its lexical activation network. This model naturally produces repetition priming and semantic interference effects. It predicts the major findings from several published experiments, demonstrating that these effects may arise from incremental learning. Furthermore, analysis of the model suggests that competition during lexical selection is not necessary for semantic interference if the learning process is itself competitive.

PMID:
19854436
PMCID:
PMC2924492
DOI:
10.1016/j.cognition.2009.09.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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