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Hum Pathol. 1991 Jan;22(1):63-9.

Mycoplasma fermentans (incognitus strain) infection in the kidneys of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and associated nephropathy: a light microscopic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural study.

Author information

1
American Registry of Pathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, DC 20306-6000.

Abstract

We studied renal tissues from 203 patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Of the 203 patients, 20 showed light-microscopic changes characteristic of AIDS-associated nephropathy (AAN). Fifteen of the 20 (group A) were examined by immunohistochemistry using Mycoplasma fermentans (incognitus strain)-specific monoclonal antibodies and electron microscopy. Renal tissues from all 15 AAN patients showed positive staining for the incognitus strain mycoplasmal antigens within glomerular endothelial and epithelial cells, glomerular basement membrane, tubular epithelial cells and casts, and mononuclear interstitial cells. Ultrastructural study of these 15 cases revealed mycoplasma-like structures in various locations including glomerular epithelial and endothelial cells, glomerular basement membrane, tubular epithelial cells and casts, and mononuclear interstitial cells. In a parallel study, renal tissues from 15 patients with AIDS with essentially normal renal histology or mild interstitial mononuclear cell infiltration (group B) were also examined. These tissues showed no evidence of incognitus strain mycoplasmal infection in renal parenchymal cells; however, occasional scattered mononuclear interstitial cells were positive for the antigens of this organism. Renal tissues from five patients dying with non-AIDS diseases (group C) showed no staining for the incognitus strain antigens in any location. Therefore, infection of renal parenchymal cells by M fermentans (incognitus strain) in the kidneys of AIDS patients is apparently associated with AAN.

PMID:
1985080
DOI:
10.1016/0046-8177(91)90063-u
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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