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Microlaryngoscopic and office-based injection of bevacizumab (Avastin) to enhance 532-nm pulsed KTP laser treatment of glottal papillomatosis.

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1
Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Center for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Photoangiolytic lasers effectively treat glottal papillomatosis, but do not reliably prevent recurrence. Therefore, sublesional injections of the antiangiogenic agent bevacizumab (Avastin) were given to assess the effect on disease recurrence and phonatory function.

METHODS:

A retrospective investigation was done in a pilot group of 10 adult patients with bilateral glottal papillomatosis who had prior angiolytic laser treatment with established patterns of recurrence. The patients underwent 5 bevacizumab injections (5 to 10 mg) into the diseased vocal folds along with 532-nm pulsed KTP laser photoangiolysis treatments 4 to 6 weeks apart. Their disease resolution was compared to findings from prior laser treatment alone, and objective measures of vocal function (acoustic, aerodynamic, Voice-Related Quality of Life survey) were obtained.

RESULTS:

All 10 patients had a greater than 90% reduction in recurrence. Four of the 10 had resolution. Four of the 10 have limited recurrent or persistent disease, receive injections of bevacizumab at 8- to 12-week intervals, and have not required laser treatment. Two of the 10 have ongoing periodic office-based KTP laser treatment along with bevacizumab injections. No patient has required microlaryngeal surgery with general anesthesia, and all 10 have had substantial improvement in vocal function.

CONCLUSIONS:

This pilot investigation provides preliminary evidence that bevacizumab injections enhance photoangiolytic laser treatment of glottal papillomatosis while enhancing phonatory function. Coupling an antiangiogenesis agent with pulsed KTP laser photoangiolysis is conceptually promising, since the mechanisms of action are complementary.

PMID:
19845188
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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