Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Diabetologia. 2010 Jan;53(1):21-6. doi: 10.1007/s00125-009-1556-8. Epub 2009 Oct 21.

Pancreatic duct replication is increased with obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans.

Author information

1
Larry Hillblom Islet Research Center, UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 90024-2852, USA.

Abstract

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS:

In a high-fat-fed rat model of type 2 diabetes we noted increased exocrine duct replication. This is a predisposing factor for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, both of which are more common in type 2 diabetes. The aim of the study reported here was to establish if obesity and/or type 2 diabetes are associated with increased pancreatic ductal replication in humans.

METHODS:

We obtained pancreas at autopsy from 45 humans, divided into four groups: lean (BMI <25 kg/m(2)); obese (BMI >27 kg/m(2)); non-diabetic; and with type 2 diabetes. Pancreases were evaluated after immunostaining for the duct cell marker cytokeratin and Ki67 for replication.

RESULTS:

We show for the first time that both obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans are associated with increased pancreatic ductal replication. Specifically, we report that (1) replication of pancreatic duct cells is increased tenfold by obesity, and (2) lean subjects with type 2 diabetes demonstrate a fourfold increase in replication of pancreatic duct cells compared with their lean non-diabetic controls.

CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION:

Pancreatic duct cell replication is increased in humans in response to both obesity and type 2 diabetes, potentially providing a mechanism for the increased risk of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in those with obesity and/or type 2 diabetes.

PMID:
19844672
PMCID:
PMC2789928
DOI:
10.1007/s00125-009-1556-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center