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Health Promot Pract. 2011 Jul;12(4):512-21. doi: 10.1177/1524839909349162. Epub 2009 Oct 20.

Understanding the decision-making process for health promotion programming at small to midsized businesses.

Author information

1
Health Promotion Research Center, University of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Seattle, Washington, USA. mchughes@u.washington.edu

Abstract

This study explores the decision-making process for implementing and continuing health promotion programs at small to midsized businesses to inform health promotion practitioners and researchers as they market their services to these businesses. Qualitative interviews are conducted with 24 employers located in the Pacific Northwest ranging in size from 75 to 800 employees, with the majority having between 100 and 200 employees. Small to midsized employers depend most on company success-related factors rather than on humanitarian motives when deciding whether to adopt workplace health promotion programs. They rely heavily on health insurers for health promotion and desire more information about the actual costs and cost-benefits of programs. To increase health promotion adoption at small to midsized businesses, health promotion practitioners should appeal to overall company success-related factors, use the insurance channel, and target their information to both human resource personnel and senior management.

PMID:
19843701
DOI:
10.1177/1524839909349162
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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