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Cancer Causes Control. 2010 Jan;21(1):171-80. doi: 10.1007/s10552-009-9447-3. Epub 2009 Oct 20.

trans-Fatty acid consumption and its association with distal colorectal cancer in the North Carolina Colon Cancer Study II.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. vinikoor@email.unc.edu

Abstract

Recently, the potential health effects of trans-fatty acid consumption have raised concerns. A few studies have examined the risk of colorectal cancer with increasing consumption of trans-fatty acids, but none investigated the risk of rectal cancer, which may have different risk factors than colon cancer. Our objective was to explore the relationship between trans-fatty acid consumption and distal colorectal (sigmoid, rectosigmoid, and rectal) cancer using a case-control study of Whites (n = 1,516) and African Americans (n = 392) in North Carolina from 2001 to 2006. Matched cases and controls were interviewed about demographic information, lifestyle factors, and diet. White cases reported higher mean consumption of trans-fatty acid than White controls, but mean consumption was similar for African American cases and controls. Relative to the lowest quartile, the highest quartiles of energy-adjusted trans-fatty acid consumption were positively associated with distal colorectal cancer for Whites [adjusted ORs for the third and fourth quartiles are 1.54 (95%CI: 1.12, 2.13) and 1.45 (95%CI: 1.04, 2.03), respectively]. Consumption was not associated with distal colorectal cancer in African Americans [adjusted ORs for the third and fourth quartiles are 0.98 (95%CI: 0.47, 2.05) and 0.87 (95%CI 0.42, 1.81), respectively]. In conclusion, high consumption of trans-fatty acids was positively associated with distal colorectal cancer among Whites.

PMID:
19842051
PMCID:
PMC2809818
DOI:
10.1007/s10552-009-9447-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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