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Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2010 Jul;18(7):982-7. doi: 10.1007/s00167-009-0938-2. Epub 2009 Oct 17.

Influence of SLAP lesions on chondral lesions of the glenohumeral joint.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University Hospital of Marburg, Baldingerstrasse, 35043 Marburg, Germany. th.patzer@web.de

Abstract

From 2004 to 2008 we evaluated 431 SLAP lesions during 3,395 shoulder arthroscopies and compared two groups of patients, one with SLAP lesion as group I and one without SLAP lesions as group II. Exclusion of type I SLAP lesions, rotator cuff tears and history of dislocation of the shoulder in both groups left 182 cases in group I, and additionally, exclusion of all-type SLAP lesions left 251 patients in group II. In group I, SLAP lesion-associated chondral lesions were present in 20% at the humerus (4% group II, p = 0.005), 18% at the glenoid (5% in group II, p = 0.05) and 14% glenohumeral (3% group II, p = 0.04). We observed a pattern of typical localization of SLAP-associated chondral lesions at the humerus underneath the biceps tendon (78%) and at the anterior half of the glenoid (63%) in group I in contrast to the central region of the humerus (82%) and the central region at the glenoid (55%) in group II. The association of SLAP and chondral lesions was not influenced by the presence of trauma or age of the patients. SLAP lesions seem to be a risk factor for subsequent early onset of osteoarthritis either caused by a bicipital chondral print or glenohumeral instability or a combination of both.

PMID:
19838677
DOI:
10.1007/s00167-009-0938-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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