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J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2009 Oct;32(8):607-15. doi: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2009.08.024.

A description of children and adolescents in Danish chiropractic practice: results from a nationwide survey.

Author information

1
Nordic Institute of Chiropractic and Clinical Biomechanics, Odense, Denmark. l.hestbaek@nikkb.dk

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to describe Danish chiropractic patients younger than 18 years.

METHODS:

Questionnaires were mailed to all chiropractic clinics in Denmark during a randomly assigned month between September 2007 and September 2008. All patients younger than 18 years or their parents were asked to complete a questionnaire collecting information on age, presenting complaint, duration and consequences of this complaint, referral mode, and use of pain medication.

RESULTS:

Babies were the most common pediatric patients with about one third being between 0 and 4 months of age. Infantile colic was the most common presenting complaint in this age group. For the older children, musculoskeletal problems were the most dominant complaint, ranging from 33% among the preschool children to 75% among the teenagers. These complaints were often chronic and about a third of the children older than 2 years had experienced symptoms for more than 1 year before seeing the chiropractor. These health complaints were reported to restrict activity as well as alter mood, and 39% of the 2- to 17-year olds used analgesics. There was limited referral of patients from other health care professionals.

CONCLUSIONS:

Babies made up most of the Danish chiropractic patients younger than 18 years. Among the older children and the adolescents, musculoskeletal complaints were most common and mostly of a chronic nature. The large number of pediatric patients in chiropractic practices and the paucity of evidence of treatment effectiveness indicate the need for further research in these age groups.

PMID:
19836596
DOI:
10.1016/j.jmpt.2009.08.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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