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Am J Public Health. 2010 May;100(5):940-6. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2007.129312. Epub 2009 Oct 15.

Allostatic load among non-Hispanic Whites, non-Hispanic Blacks, and people of Mexican origin: effects of ethnicity, nativity, and acculturation.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555-1153, USA. mkpeek@utmb.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We investigated ethnic differences in allostatic load in a population-based sample of adults living in Texas City, TX, and assessed the effects of nativity and acculturation status on allostatic load among people of Mexican origin.

METHODS:

We used logistic regression models to examine ethnic variations in allostatic load scores among non-Hispanic Whites, non-Hispanic Blacks, and people of Mexican origin. We also examined associations between measures of acculturation and allostatic load scores among people of Mexican origin only.

RESULTS:

Foreign-born Mexicans were the least likely group to score in the higher allostatic load categories. Among individuals of Mexican origin, US-born Mexican Americans had higher allostatic load scores than foreign-born Mexicans, and acculturation measures did not account for the difference.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings expand on recent research from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey with respect to ethnicity and allostatic load. Our results are consistent with the healthy immigrant hypothesis (i.e., newer immigrants are healthier) and the acculturation hypothesis, according to which the longer Mexican immigrants reside in the United States, the greater their likelihood of potentially losing culture-related health-protective effects.

PMID:
19834005
PMCID:
PMC2853615
DOI:
10.2105/AJPH.2007.129312
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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