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Clin Oral Implants Res. 2009 Nov;20(11):1200-5. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0501.2009.01722.x.

Improvement and long-term stability of neuromuscular adaptation in implant-supported overdentures.

Author information

1
School of Dental Medicine, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany. siegfried.heckmann@uk-erlangen.de

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

In edentulous patients, implant-supported overdentures can improve chewing efficiency and patient satisfaction, and even a positive impact on bone tissue preservation has been observed. The objective of this long-term study was to investigate whether kinesiographic and electromyographic (EMG) parameters would also benefit from implant placement and whether the status achieved would remain consistent over time.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

The functional adaptability of the neuromuscular system in edentulous patients has been recorded in four different states of restoration: (1) insufficient old dentures, (2) new complete dentures, (3) implant-supported overdentures, and (4) implant-supported overdentures 10 years in use. In each state of restoration, the neuromuscular adaptation was assessed during masticatory activity on the basis of myodynamic parameters such as vertical opening, frontal extension and closing velocity. EMG parameters, i.e. Musculus masseter and Musculus temporalis activities were recorded simultaneously.

RESULTS:

The results revealed a general increase in the myodynamic and EMG-parameters. All of them clearly approached the values for normal dentate subjects and maintained this level over a period of 10 years. The significant changes between states 2 and 3 indicate that implant stabilization of dentures is accompanied by an immediate increase of the neuromuscular parameters.

CONCLUSIONS:

In elderly edentulous patients, the treatment with two interforaminal implants provides evidence of neuromuscular adaptation towards values of healthy dentate. Thus, the known benefits of implant placement such as tissue perseverance and improved function are complemented by improved neuromuscular adaptation.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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