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BMC Neurol. 2009 Oct 13;9:54. doi: 10.1186/1471-2377-9-54.

Neutralizing antibodies explain the poor clinical response to interferon beta in a small proportion of patients with multiple sclerosis: a retrospective study.

Author information

1
Departments of Neurological Sciences, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy. emilia.sbardella@uniroma1.it

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against Interferon beta (IFNbeta) are reported to be associated with poor clinical response to therapy in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. We aimed to quantify the contribution of NAbs to the sub-optimal response of IFNbeta treatment.

METHODS:

We studied the prevalence of NAbs in MS patients grouped according to their clinical response to IFNbeta during the treatment period. Patients were classified as: group A, developing >or= 1 relapse after the first 6 months of therapy; group B, exhibiting confirmed disability progression after the first 6 months of therapy, with or without superimposed relapses; group C, presenting a stable disease course during therapy. A cytopathic effect assay tested the presence of NAbs in a cohort of ambulatory MS patients treated with one of the available IFNbeta formulations for at least one year. NAbs positivity was defined as NAbs titre >or= 20 TRU.

RESULTS:

Seventeen patients (12.1%) were NAbs positive. NAbs positivity correlated with poorer clinical response (p < 0.04). As expected, the prevalence of NAbs was significantly lower in Group C (2.1%) than in Group A (17.0%) and Group B (17.0%). However, in the groups of patients with a poor clinical response (A, B), NAbs positivity was found only in a small proportion of patients.

CONCLUSION:

The majority of patients with poor clinical response are NAbs negative suggesting that NAbs explains only partially the sub-optimal response to IFNbeta.

PMID:
19825153
PMCID:
PMC2770509
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2377-9-54
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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