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Int J Immunopathol Pharmacol. 2009 Jul-Sep;22(3):745-54.

Molecular study of receptor for advanced glycation endproduct gene promoter and identification of specific HLA haplotypes possibly involved in chronic fatigue syndrome.

Author information

1
Genetics and Microbiology Department, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy.

Abstract

The receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE) is thought to play an important role in inflammation. Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a long-lasting fatigue that compromises at least 50% of a subject's daily activities without other known cause. Immune dysfunction has been implicated and an association with a peculiar genetic cytokine profile, predisposing to an immunomodulatory response of inflammatory nature, was found. The aim of this study is to analyse RAGE polymorphisms and HLA-DRB1 alleles in seventy-five Italian CFS patients and 141 controls matched for age, sex and ethnicity. These two groups underwent genomic study for RAGE 374T/A and 429C/T promoter polymorphisms; moreover, 46 patients and 186 controls were typed for HLA-DRB1 at low resolution molecular level. Of these, 31 patients and 99 controls also underwent high resolution analysis to define the HLA-DRB1*11 and DRB1*13 alleles. The haplotypes RAGE-374T, DRB1*04; RAGE-374T, DRB1*09; RAGE-374T, DRB1*11; RAGE-374A, DRB1*13; RAGE-429T, DRB1*04 and RAGE-429C, DRB1*11 were significantly more frequent in CFS patients, whereas RAGE-429C, DRB1*07 would seem protective. A significantly lower frequency of DRB1*1104 (5.4% vs 12.9% p=0.04, OR=0.39) and a significantly higher frequency of HLA-DRB1*1301 (13.0% vs 5.1% p=0.006, OR= 2.79) were found in CFS patients. A synergic effect was observed with RAGE polymorphism. The OR values strengthened in the following cis combinations: RAGE-374A, HLA-DRB1*1104 (OR=0.27) and RAGE-374A, HLADRB1*1301 (OR=6.23). HLA haplotypes rather than single alleles of RAGE or of DRB1 genes seem to be involved in CFS, probably including a subregion of major interest.

PMID:
19822091
DOI:
10.1177/039463200902200320
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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