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Int J Gynecol Cancer. 2009 Aug;19(6):992-7. doi: 10.1111/IGC.0b013e3181aaa93a.

Expression profiles of genes involved in poor prognosis of epithelial ovarian carcinoma: a review.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the commonest cause of gynecological cancer-related mortality. Although the prognosis for patients with advanced cancer is poor, there is a wide range of outcomes for individual patients.

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to review molecular factors predictive of poor prognosis of women with EOC by reviewing microarray research identifying gene expression profiles.

METHODS:

A systematic search was performed in the electronic databases PubMed and ScienceDirect up to July 2008, combining the keywords "genome-wide," "microarray," "epithelial ovarian cancer" "prognosis," and "epithelial-mesenchymal transition" with specific expression profiles of genes.

RESULTS:

Many genes that participated in cell signaling, growth factors, transcription factors, proteinases, metabolism, cell adhesion, extracellular matrix component, cell proliferation, and anti-apoptosis were overexpressed in patients with poor prognosis. Several important prognosis-related genes overlap with those known to be regulated by epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). This signaling pathway of EMT (E-cadherin, beta-catenin, receptor tyrosine kinases, NF-kappaB, TGF-beta, or Wnt signalings) will be discussed, as it provides new insights into a new treatment strategy.

CONCLUSIONS:

This review summarizes recent advances in prognosis-related molecular biology. Collectively, molecular changes possibly through EMT are considered to be a major contributor to the poor prognosis of EOC.

PMID:
19820358
DOI:
10.1111/IGC.0b013e3181aaa93a
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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