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Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol. 2009 Dec;297(6):L1131-40. doi: 10.1152/ajplung.00085.2009. Epub 2009 Oct 9.

Airway surface liquid depth measured in ex vivo fragments of pig and human trachea: dependence on Na+ and Cl- channel function.

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1
Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care, Univ. of California, San Francisco, 94143-0521, USA.

Abstract

The airway surface liquid (ASL) is the thin fluid layer lining the airways whose depth may be reduced in cystic fibrosis. Prior measurements of ASL depth have been made in airway epithelial cell cultures. Here, we established methodology to measure ASL depth to approximately 1-microm accuracy in ex vivo fragments of freshly obtained human and pig tracheas. Airway fragments were mounted in chambers designed for perfusion of the basal surface and observation of the apical, fluorescently stained ASL by scanning confocal microscopy using a high numerical aperture lens immersed in perfluorocarbon. Measurement accuracy was verified using standards of specified fluid thickness. ASL depth in well-differentiated primary cultures of human nasal respiratory epithelium was 8.0 +/- 0.5 microm (SE 10 cultures) under basal conditions, 8.4 +/- 0.4 microm following ENaC inhibition by amiloride, and 14.5 +/- 1.2 microm following CFTR stimulation by cAMP agonists. ASL depth in human trachea was 7.0 +/- 0.7 microm under basal conditions, 11.0 +/- 1.7 microm following amiloride, 17.0 +/- 3.4 microm following cAMP agonists, and 7.1 +/- 0.5 microm after CFTR inhibition. Similar results were found in pig trachea. This study provides the first direct measurements of ASL depth in intact human airways and indicates the involvement of ENaC sodium channels and CFTR chloride channels in determining ASL depth. We suggest that CF lung disease may be caused by the inability of CFTR-deficient airways to increase their ASL depth transiently following secretory stimuli that in non-CF airways produce transient increases in ASL depth.

PMID:
19820035
PMCID:
PMC2793186
DOI:
10.1152/ajplung.00085.2009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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