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Antivir Ther. 2009;14(6):763-9. doi: 10.3851/IMP1290.

Oxidant stress in HIV-infected women from the Women's Interagency HIV Study.

Author information

1
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA. mag2005@med.cornell.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Oxidant stress contributes to the pathogenesis of multiple conditions and can be assessed by measuring plasma F(2)-isoprostane concentrations. We hypothesized that oxidant stress is associated with plasma homocysteine concentration and risk factors for atherosclerosis in HIV-infected women.

METHODS:

We measured plasma F(2)-isoprostane concentrations in a cross-sectional study of 249 HIV-infected women attending the Bronx (NY, USA) site of the Women's Interagency HIV Study and assessed associations with plasma homocysteine concentration and other metabolic parameters by linear regression.

RESULTS:

In multivariate analysis, hepatitis C virus (HCV) viraemia, waist circumference, homocysteine concentration and serum aspartate aminotransferase level were positively associated with log F(2)-isoprostane concentration (all P<0.005). There was a trend for an inverse association between log F(2)-isoprostane and CD4(+) T-cell percentage (P=0.06). Among women with HCV infection, the FIB-4 index, an indirect marker of liver fibrosis derived from routine laboratory tests, was positively associated with log F(2)-isoprostane concentration.

CONCLUSIONS:

In this cross-sectional study of HIV-infected women, plasma F(2)-isoprostane concentration was positively associated with homocysteine concentration, as well as HCV infection, abdominal obesity and aspartate aminotransferase level.

PMID:
19812438
PMCID:
PMC2760028
DOI:
10.3851/IMP1290
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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