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J Sci Med Sport. 2010 Jul;13(4):429-33. doi: 10.1016/j.jsams.2009.08.002. Epub 2009 Oct 7.

Strength increases in upper and lower body are larger with longer inter-set rest intervals in trained men.

Author information

1
Laboratory for Clinical and Experimental Research in Vascular Biology (BioVasc), Biomedical Center, State University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Abstract

The purpose of the current study was to compare different rest interval durations on upper and lower body strength. Thirty-six recreationally trained men were randomly assigned to 1 min (G1; n=12), 3 min (G3; n=12) or 5 min (G5; n=12) rest interval groups. Each group performed the same resistance training program. Maximal strength was assessed at baseline, mid-point (8 weeks) and post-training (16 weeks) for the bench press and leg press exercises. For the bench press, significant increases were demonstrated within G3 and G5 at 8 weeks and at 16 weeks versus baseline (p<0.05). Additionally, for the bench press, G5 (98.2+/-3.7 kg) was significantly stronger than G1 (92.5+/-3.8 kg) at 16 weeks (p<0.05). For the leg press, significant increases were demonstrated within all groups at 8 weeks and at 16 weeks versus baseline (p<0.05). Additionally, for the leg press, G5 (290.8+/-23.5 kg) was significantly stronger than G1 (251.0+/-15.8 kg) at 8 weeks (p<0.01) and G3 (305.0+/-23.9 kg) and G5 (321.7+/-21.7 kg) were significantly stronger than G1 (276.7+/-10.7 kg) at 16 weeks (p<0.05). The findings of the current study indicate that utilising 3 or 5 min rest intervals between sets may result in significantly greater increases in upper and lower body strength beyond the initial weeks of training versus utilising 1-min rest intervals between sets.

PMID:
19811949
DOI:
10.1016/j.jsams.2009.08.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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