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J Vis. 2009 Sep 10;9(10):10.1-17. doi: 10.1167/9.10.10.

The gender-specific face aftereffect is based in retinotopic not spatiotopic coordinates across several natural image transformations.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA. afraz@fas.harvard.edu

Abstract

In four experiments, we measured the gender-specific face-aftereffect following subject's eye movement, head rotation, or head movement toward the display and following movement of the adapting stimulus itself to a new test location. In all experiments, the face aftereffect was strongest at the retinal position, orientation, and size of the adaptor. There was no advantage for the spatiotopic location in any experiment nor was there an advantage for the location newly occupied by the adapting face after it moved in the final experiment. Nevertheless, the aftereffect showed a broad gradient of transfer across location, orientation and size that, although centered on the retinotopic values of the adapting stimulus, covered ranges far exceeding the tuning bandwidths of neurons in early visual cortices. These results are consistent with a high-level site of adaptation (e.g. FFA) where units of face analysis have modest coverage of visual field, centered in retinotopic coordinates, but relatively broad tolerance for variations in size and orientation.

PMID:
19810791
PMCID:
PMC2792707
DOI:
10.1167/9.10.10
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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