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Methods Find Exp Clin Pharmacol. 2009 Jul-Aug;31(6):383-7. doi: 10.1358/mf.2009.31.6.1386992.

Possible role of trazodone and imipramine in sleep deprivation-induced anxiety-like behavior and oxidative damage in mice.

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1
Pharmacology Division, University Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Panjab University, Chandigarh, India. kumaruips@yahoo.com

Abstract

Sleep is one of the key regulators for maintaining physical, mental and emotional health. Nonrefreshing sleep and depression are common problems nowadays. The present study was designed to explore the protective effects of trazodone and imipramine on 72-h sleep deprivation-induced anxiety-like behavior and oxidative damage in mice. Albino mice were sleep-deprived for a period of 72 h using the grid suspended over water method. Animals were divided into different groups, each consisting of six animals. Trazodone (5 and 10 mg/kg i.p.) and imipramine (10 and 20 mg/kg i.p.) were administered for 5 days starting 2 days before 72-h sleep deprivation. Various behavioral tests (elevated plus maze, zero maze, mirror chamber for anxiety and actophotometer), followed by oxidative parameter tests (malondialdehyde, glutathione, catalase, nitrite and protein), were assessed in sleep-deprived animals. Treatment with trazodone and imipramine significantly improved locomotor activity and exerted anxiolytic-like effects in all paradigm tasks (mirror chamber, elevated plus maze, zero maze) as compared to untreated 72-h sleep-deprived animals (P < 0.05). Biochemically, both trazodone and imipramine significantly restored depleted reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and catalase activity and attenuated raised lipid peroxidation and nitrite concentrations as compared to untreated sleep-deprived animals. The results of the present study suggest a protective effect for trazodone and imipramine on sleep deprivation-induced anxiety-like behavior and oxidative damage in mice.

PMID:
19798453
DOI:
10.1358/mf.2009.31.6.1386992
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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